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I know a few knitters who do not have Work In Process (WIP) projects or UnFinished Objects (UFOs) lying around the house. And I know knitters who have WIPs and UFOs in dark corners of their closets.

I admit. I have more than my fair share of WIPs and UFOs. Some live in variety of states in their baskets and armchairs around places where I normally sit, some live in their relatively organized state of dormant-ness in cabinets. They have all been abandoned for one reason or another.

A few months ago, I did my latest round of culling these WIPs and UFOs. I think what I have now on my hands are projects that I want to finish. (Oh and yes, it felt so good to just throw away that Kaffe Fassett intarsia cardigan in fingering weight cotton.) Some are a bit daunting — one sleeve left to go on Alice Starmore’s Mary Tudor sweater that I abandoned in 1998, for example — and some are not so daunting.

Intention #2 for 2015: Along with all Crafters, world wide. Finish those WIPs and UFOs!!!

I bet this is a pretty popular intention at the start of the year. I have been trying to be at it so far this month though, and have made pretty good progress on several projects.

Like…My brother-in-law’s cashmere fisherman’s cardigan.

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My BIL is not a big person. But you know what? He is still man-sized. Which is (thankfully) bigger than me by more than a couple of inches in every dimension, making this sweater infinitely larger than what I want to knit. On top of that, he was SO EXCITED for a hand knit sweater, running out to go get the yarn, and the buttons. To boot, his mother is a tailor, making him rather particular regarding details on his clothing. Which just increases the stress level for me. But this needs to be completed. I need it off my plate.

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Or, this sweater. I’m almost finished, but it’s a turtleneck sweater in chain plied merino (um, shall we call it a single season sweater?). The yarn is beautiful….FAR by Woolfolk. (Read more about Woolfolk here — I think it’s a great story). And the pattern is frankensteined out of Adara by Michelle Wang (for the beautiful color work and the “feel” for the sweater) and Blank Canvas by Ysolda Teague (for the fit. This is a WONDERFUL pattern to have on hand for a great raglan/saddle shoulder worked in the round).

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Or, remember this shawl? It’s the project that I said would be the “NEXT POST” back in…August and because I didn’t finish, made me go on a hiatus on this blog. Knit out of laceweight yarn that I handspun from a gorgeous Hedgehog Fibres batt.

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Or this color work vest, Barrington Vest by Jared Flood, out of Brooklyn Tweed LOFT  which would be a welcome addition to my work wardrobe!

These are just a few examples. I would love these garments as finished objects, and I intend to finish them this year. This is one of the reasons why 2015 Intention #1 was accessories-centric — I have plenty of BIG projects already in progress. (And projects that I don’t….hate!)

Here’s to clearing off some of these works in process off my To Do list!

I was recently asked whether I had ever finished the sweater I was knitting out of Cambridge’s fleece.

I thought I had posted these photos! The Kingscot cardigan is finished!

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Here it is, on a “photo shoot” with the ewe herself. I love this photo not only because it’s kind of cool that I’m holding the sheep that gave me the beautiful fleece, but because of the onlookers in the background. Makes me laugh every time!

I saw Cambridge recently, and she is very busy growing my next fleece. You can already see, I think from above, but it’s looking a bit lighter in color. She is just CRANKING out the fleece, after a bit of a tough start I’m guessing because of the harsh winter, and I would not be surprised if her fleece was close to 10 pounds. (…of platinum to grey and GORGEOUS. Can’t wait.)

Yes, hawk-eyed friends, that IS a double pointed needle holding the cardigan shut.

Since then, I purchased some buttons made out of deer antler (as an homage to Lucy’s Great Adventure).

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The sweater is softer than I imagined it could ever be — Cambridge’s fleece has been a big surprise on that front, I must say — and it almost looks shiny because the fibers are so lustrous.

I still have another big batch of her fleece left, which was just washed recently —

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— and I am contemplating what I should be making with this fiber. I’m wondering if I can engineer a zipped vest with pockets that will take the place of the felted merino vest that I wear all the time to walk my dogs….to the drawing board….

I had fun processing Cambridge’s fleece. (My first full raw fleece!)

I had fun spinning Cambridge’s fleece.

I had fun making Cambridge fleece into a delicate wisp of a shawl.

How is Cambridge coming along as a sweater, you ask?

Well, splendidly. (I think; so far, etc. with all the caveats.)

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The dark bits of Cambridge that I processed and spun into the grey yarn of a million shades, I was convinced, needed to be a swingy cardigan. I didn’t spin the yarn with too much twist, mostly because her fleece didn’t need it, but also because I wanted to try to make the yarn as airy as possible…there’s nothing worse to me than a sweater that is so heavy in weight that it hangs like a sack from the shoulder seams no matter what you do…and I didn’t think the long wool would be best served spun woolen. (Which I actually may change my mind about, see the P.S. below.)

I wanted a pattern that had a bit more going on than just a plain stockinette sweater, and I made up my mind that Norah Gaughan’s Kingscot (which appeared in Twist Collective Winter 2008) was just the thing. It’s got a very pretty cable and bobble pattern on the front in a diamond pattern, and while the shape was swingy, the back was ribbing which I thought would provide a better fit.

I knew somewhere deep in my brain that the stitch pattern may not show as well with this yarn, and if I wanted the cardigan to be all about the cabling motif, I was better served using a crisper yarn with tighter twist.

Of course I ignored this instinct because I wanted to make this cardigan with this yarn. “Want” in this case totally trumped the logic.

I’m not sure if I am right, or if, ultimately I’m going to be not so right. Not yet, anyway.

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I have a vision for what I want this sweater to be. My gauge was wildly different though, and as this was handspun, so I knew it wasn’t going to be as consistent in gauge as much as a commercial yarn would be. And, I wanted to make sure that while I kept the major design points of the garment, I wanted it to fit me well. This all meant some big modifications. Don’t be scared! This can be done.

So…what were the important things about this sweater for me?

1. The A-line of the body of the sweater. This shape, in my opinion, can be really difficult. I have seen the fly away cardigan that is too tight on a body, and that is not very flattering (unless you are pregnant. I love fly away cardi’s on pregnant women). I needed enough fabric in the front so that even if there were only 3 buttons on the top that it would not gape open in the middle. I trusted that Norah, who has designed gazillion sweaters, had this in mind and that there was a reason that the back was ribbed….so I kept the ribbing pattern in the back.

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2. I did modify the stockinette to ribbing ratio all over the sweater. I could see how, with a tighter twist yarn that you’d need the dramatic decreasing between the ribbing and the stockinette, but I didn’t think I needed quite so much with my yarn. (And I tested this with swatching.)

3. I loved the design on the front of the cardigan. While I toyed with changing the size of the bobbles (to something a bit more pronounced), but in the end stuck with the instructions as written. I’m not sure why I thought I needed to fool with this.

This is where I am now. I couldn’t “see” the sweater as it came off the needles, so I ended up blocking it to the schematic for my size to see how the fabric looked.

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I think I am cautiously optimistic.

Some people, I think, would be bothered by what appears to be subtle color blocking within the garment. I actually am not bothered by it much, because Cambridge is pretty spotty and I love that one sheep can produce so many shades of grey. The sweater is so…HER! So much so that if Cambridge were a human, I’d give her this cardigan.

I am knitting the sleeves now, and I don’t envision any changes except that I may have to do some math to make sure the sleeve cap fits properly…not a big deal. Knit fabric is really flexible!

I also envision changing the button band from as written. While the knitted then sewn on button band is a beautiful, elongating detail on the sample sweater, my seamstress hands (or lack there of) started twitching so I will most likely be picking up the button band along the edge of the sweater and keeping that in a 2×2 rib as the most of the ribbing on the cardigan. And, don’t be surprised if I change the 1×1 twisted rib on the neckline to a 2×2 rib as well for consistency.

Hopefully, the next Cambridge update will be about a finished cardigan!

P.S. As many of you know, hand combing takes out all the short fibers out of the fleece as you create top (the ice cream fluff in the first link at the top of the post). We did take what was left over and put it through a drum carder to create rolags, which I spun woolen and 3-plied into an aran weight yarn.

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It was really soft, and really airy. Soft enough for a pair of wristlets, which has been keeping Cambridge’s Shepherdess warm this past winter.

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You know, this is all to make sure that Cambridge was always on Lee’s mind so she got some good grain this winter! And, it looks like she’s getting a bit lighter so I will be looking forward to what her fleece looks like come shearing in November! (Of course I will be peeking a lot sooner than November!)

Of course I have a photo:

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