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One of the favorite things about knitting for me is the whole process of matching the right yarn to the right garment. When it goes right, I feel like it is Christmas…when it goes wrong….well…I can usually tell before I finish so I can rip it out!

When Clara Parkes decided to make a bit of yarn, I was excited. She has touched, smelled and swatched more yarns than anyone I can think of (her Craftsy class, here) — so I knew she would create yarns that would be fun to knit.

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First came Clara Yarn Cormo 1.0. Good thing I had spun some cormo and knew that the yarn would be deceptive in the skein. This yarn was 4 plies of worsted spun goodness waiting to be knit….but I knew it was going to do the “boooinnnggg”/blooming thing once the crimp of the fiber was allowed to do its thing. Of course I swatched….I thought I wanted some sort of a pattern stitch, since this was a yarn created for great stitch definition,  but I knew I wanted at least part of the fabric to be an homage to the bounciness of the yarn. In my mind, there is one fabric that showcases the best of what wool can be in a fabric….I’m very biased here..garter stitch.

I did cast this yarn on in a different sweater than the one I ended up with at first. I had about half of the sweater knit before I decided that I needed something else. (The best thing about knitting is that you can change your mind mid-course!)

Then I saw it…Carrie Bostick Hoge, a designer I admired for the designs for Quince & Co., published Madder Anthology. One of the sweaters in this collection was a garter stitch cardigan that featured Indian Cross Stitch at the cuffs, collars and the edge of pockets. Perfect! Of course, I monkeyed with the pattern a little, mostly for gauge difference, but I am happy with the result.

Here it is, The Beatrice Cardigan in Clara Yarn Cormo 1.0. In the gorgeous creamy white of the cormo sheep from Montana that this yarn is made of.

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The sweater is totally wearable. The garter stitch fabric is perfect for this round, bouncy yarn and the Indian Cross Stitch adds a nice non-cable, non-lace accent,

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…and of course I love pockets!

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Then came the second yarn,  Romeldale (aka California Variegated Mutant or CVM)1.0. in three glorious natural colors. I love spinning Romeldale. (OK, OK, I love spinning cormo, too.) I had a sneak peak of this yarn…I wasn’t able to guess the breed, but I knew the yarn was woolen spun. It was lofty and delicious….and slightly lighter weight yarn than Cormo 1.0.  I knew as soon as I saw the colors that I had to make a colorwork yoke sweater, something that would really show off the beautiful colors.

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I didn’t really have to think too hard. This yarn was going to become Grettir by Jared Flood.

I added some shaping along the princess seam line as I now do with most of my sweaters (thanks, Amy Herzog!), changed the yoke from 4 colors to 3, but other than that, this sweater was knit as instructed.

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Only nature can take browns and make them glorious like this.

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This sweater is a bit less dressy than my Beatrice, which is completely work worthy, but I will very likely be living in this sweater this winter.

I know I haven’t written lately, but that is what happens when you declare the next post to be about a garment that is still on the needles!!! I’ll get back to that handspun shawl after Christmas knitting.

Remember Cambridge of the grey fleece?

I left you as I had just begun to spin singles from her fleece. I was spinning the silvery puffs of it into yarn for the very first knitted project out of her gorgeous fleece.

I just started spinning earlier this year, so I was a little bit nervous. Yes, I have been practicing a little bit every day, trying to get some skill under my belt, with the ultimate goal of being able to create just the yarn I meant to create. My opinion about yarn is well beyond my spinning skills however, and I still consider myself a novice. I felt though, that I had obsessed enough about Cambridge’s fleece and how I wanted to spin it, that I should just go for it. Besides, there’s more than 7 pounds of unprocessed stuff behind this small bit of processed fleece that I knew I had to start somewhere!

Cambridge has been bred to produce a long wool (and her staple length was 6″), so her fleece does not need to be twisted too tightly together to hold. In fact, since I wanted to create as soft a yarn as possible, I did not want to seize up the fibers by twisting it too much. If I were more versed in spinning, I would have talked about the angle of twist, and how many twists per inch I was aiming for….but I am 100% going by how things felt in my hands and by intuition. (OK, some would say winging it, and I have to admit I was!)

I was cautiously optimistic with the yarn that came off my wheel. The color is absolutely amazing.

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Each single is about 5 strands of her fiber, and I twisted/plied 2 of these singles together to create this yarn. So the yarn is pretty fine. It is a 2-ply lace weight yarn, which is what I was aiming for.

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I made a fine yarn because I thought the first project from Cambridge’s fleece should be a gossamer wisp of a shawl. I wanted to challenge myself from a spinning standpoint, but I really wanted to remember how I felt as Lee and I combed out bits of her fleece — the fluffy, cloud like puffs that emerged as we processed her fleece.

Yarn made from Cambridge’s fleece, technically, should not be next to the skin soft (I will leave explanation of all of this to Clara Parkes, here). A sample of her fleece will be sent in to be tested, but the diameter of each fiber will likely be over 30 microns. I was surprised, as I cast on, how soft the yarn felt. (Which I actually wrote off to psychosomatic wishful thinking.)

Now, I may have been nervous as I sat in front of a spinning wheel with Cambridge, but once I had the yarn and I had some knitting sticks in my hand, i had zero trepidation.  I knew exactly what to do, and I wanted to do some magic with the sticks.

The first Cambridge project needed to be a classic shawl, with classic lace motifs. I pulled out my trusty little bible for such thingsEvelyn A. Clark’s Knitting Lace Triangles

Evelyn Clark has designed some amazing shawls. There are close to 11,000 of her Swallowtail shawls up on “the system” on Ravelry. I was lucky enough to take her shawl design class at Madrona this year.

Knitting Lace Triangles gives you a basic outline of how to create a lace triangle of your own design using some building blocks that Evelyn outlines. I used 2 lace motifs, the ripple lace and the medallion lace. Classic. That is what I was shooting for.

Here it is! A lace triangle that is 55″ wide and 23″ deep at the center. I hope I did Cambridge proud!

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